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75 Maple Street
Summit, NJ 07901
908.273.0350

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(908) 273 0350

 

A Vote for Dustoline

norton hardwareThe Summit Herald of March 16, 1907 reported that the state legislature voted against the Blohm Bill, which would have permitted municipalities to allow sale of alcohol on Sundays. The Street Committee of Common Council voted unanimously to use Dustoline as a dust preventative on Summit streets in the summer months. Professor Everton "the greatest hypnotist of the 20th century" was scheduled to demonstrate his skills at Colonial Hall.

The classified ads were full of lost items being sought: a diamond earring, a gold medal marked "Kent Place School Indoor Meet", and a string of gold beads. Rewards were offered for all of these; the owner of the gold beads promised $3 for their safe return. A 7-room house, with barn and wagon shed was for sale for $2000

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php

Help Wanted, Draft Exempt

dockyardThe Summit Herald of March 9, 1944 reported on several Summit residents serving in the armed forces. Major William Duncan of the Army Air Force was awarded the Legion of Merit for meritorious performance in the North African theater of operations. Miss Rita Berg was training as a storekeeper in the WAVES. Sergeant James Salerno, a Marine, came home on furlough from the Pacific wearing six service stars, including a presidential citation for bravery at Guadalcanal. Private Salvatore Dellomo was killed in Italy.

Drew University student Benjamin Iijima spoke at Calvary Church about his experiences as an American-born citizen with Japanese parents. His family lived on the West Coast, where his parents worked as gardeners. After the attack on Pearl Harbor, they were sent to a relocation camp, but were first held for three months at a race track, where the family was quartered in a horse stall.

The Lyric Theatre presented “For Whom the Bell Tolls”, in gorgeous Technicolor, starring Gary Cooper and Ingrid Bergman.

In the classified ads, a dental lab was looking for a boy or man—not draft-eligible—to train as an assistant. Citizens Trust Co. wanted men between 40 and 50 for janitorial work. Essex Electronics was looking for girls and women, aged 16-50, to do war-related work (no experience necessary, overtime guaranteed).

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php

Spring Approaches, Clock Starts Again

canned foodsThe Summit Record of March 2, 1923 reported that with the coming of milder weather, the town clock was working once again, after several months of being literally frozen at 4:03. The Summit Red Cross was collecting used clothing for Russian refugees, especially children. The State Motor Vehicle Commissioner reported that 527 people were killed in auto accidents in 1922, an increase of 100 over the previous year. Ten-year-old Lawrence Keppell was recovering at Overlook Hospital after being dragged several hundred feet by a team of runaway horses. The parishioners of St. Teresa’s Church raised funds to send the assistant rector to Florida. Father Spielman spent two months in the hospital after an operation followed by pneumonia, and it was felt that warm southern weather would help him recover.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php