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75 Maple Street
Summit, NJ 07901
908.273.0350

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(908) 273 0350

 

Electric Lights for the Streets of Summit?

bonesThe Summit Record of May 10, 1890 reported that the Township Committee heard proposals from several companies for public street lighting. Options included gas and electricity (either the Westinghouse incandescent light or the Thomson-Houston arc light). The Editor expressed the hope that, all things being equal, the contract would be awarded to Summit resident W.A.E. Doying, who proposed the Westinghouse system, at a cost of $20 per light annually.

The Editor praised the efforts of the New York Evening Post to expose the rottenness of Tammany Hall. He hoped they would continue those efforts until the people of New York rose up to "crush the monster of corruption they have nurtured into strength."

Justice Kelly sentenced Agnes Pullen to 45 days in the county jail upon complaint of her husband for drunkenness and disorderly conduct.

In the classified ads: for sale, a street watering cart, a one-horse surrey, English pug puppies, and an English pony mare (13 hands). Lost, a small bunch of keys. Liberal reward offered.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:

http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php

 

Save Wheat: Eat Potatoes, Bake War Bread

uncle samThe Summit Herald of May 3, 1918 reported that the first twenty "farmerettes" arrived at the Union County Farm Camp. Three of them were from Summit. The farmerettes were available to help local farmers for an eight-hour day at 25¢ per hour. Local residents were asked to help the Land Army by lending motor vehicles to transport the farmerettes to their destinations.

Mrs. Berger of Hobart Avenue shared a "war bread" recipe: bran bread made with a quart of bran, a quart of rice flour, and a cup of wheat flour. The State Department of Agriculture reported that more people were following the government's recommendation to eat more potatoes in order to conserve wheat.

Members of the Summit branch of the Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage were asked to attend a short meeting at the YMCA. The Summit Police and Firemen were planning a baseball game at the St. Teresa's Ball Grounds to aid the War Fund. Tickets, 50¢.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:

http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php

Money is Getting Smaller

energyThe Summit Herald of April 26, 1929 reported that Common Council agreed to have the pavement along Springfield Avenue torn up from Kent Place Boulevard to Chestnut Avenue, to lay ducts for phone lines to the new New Jersey Bell Telephone central office.

In his column, "Major Freelance" commented on the soon-to-be-released new paper money. The bills would be [25%] smaller, which should make them popular with women who keep their money tucked into their stockings.

In the classifieds: Lost, police dog. Answers to "Brownie". Contact Summit police department. Wanted, a reliable man as night watchman for the Blind Babies Home. $40 a month, plus board. Wanted, a young Italian girl to learn to repair silk stockings. Some knowledge of sewing and machine work. Wanted, a Swedish laundress for Mondays and Tuesdays. For Sale: three-piece artificial leather living-room set, $12. For Sale, Oak refrigerator with porcelain lining.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php