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75 Maple Street
Summit, NJ 07901
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Off to See Buffalo Bill

gas rangeThe Summit Herald of April 20, 1901 reported that Rev. Alexander Tuttle, the new pastor at the Methodist Episcopal Church, would be giving his first sermon. At the Common Council Meeting, the Assistant Fire Chief reported on a recent chimney fire which was extinguished at the “considerable cost” of $12. He recommended that the Council pass an ordinance requiring homeowners to clean their chimneys annually, and to impose a fine if the Fire Department was called out for a fire that resulted from a chimney not being cleaned. A group of schoolchildren, teachers, and ladies took the train into New York City to enjoy the spectacle of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show.

The classified ads listed a variety of horses for sale, from a bay mare to a team of heavy horse (and a farm wagon).  Those in need of a good coachman could hire a “first class German”, married but without children, who was also experienced at gardening.

An anarchist from Argentina was arrested in connection with a plot to assassinate the German emperor. Captured papers indicated that he was acting on orders from anarchists in Paterson, who also planned to kill the czar of Russia and the king and queen of Italy. An epidemic of bubonic plague was reported in Australia.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php

An Easter Cotillion

YMCAbasketballThe Summit Herald of April 13, 1907 reported that the YMCA junior basketball team finished a successful season, having won 12 out of 16 games. The dancing class of Miss Grace Porter’s school held an Easter cotillion, which concluded with a serpentine dance and a confetti “battle”. News came from Dresden that former Summit resident Miss Jayta Humphreys had married Captain Heinrich von Wolf of the German Army. Miss Humphreys’ stepfather, T. St. John Gaffney, was the American Consul in Dresden. Miss Ida Mawson, of London, advertised her services as a singing teacher. A generous award was offered for the return of a missing white bull terrier. Union Hose Company No. 1 was called out to extinguish a blaze in a pile of manure in a vacant lot. It was brought under control within two hours.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php

32 Arrested in Raid on "Disorderly House"

ginghamThe Summit Herald of April 6, 1923 reported that preparations were underway for the annual Overlook Hospital charity ball. This year’s theme was to be Venice in carnival time. Former Summit mayor Ruford Franklin had been appointed State Civilian Aide to the Secretary of War. This was a volunteer position responsible for handling applications to Citizens’ Military Training Camps—former military camps repurposed to teach military preparedness to civilians. Daylight-savings was to begin on the last Sunday in April. Although it had not been legally imposed nationwide since the end of the World War, it was adopted by New York City, Newark, Hoboken, and other large towns, forcing smaller municipalities like Summit to do the same. A detailed map showed the proposed location of Memorial Field.

“Broadcast Bill’s” column noted happily that the Summit Public Library had started carrying a major magazine for radio enthusiasts. The “Heraldings for Housewives” column provided a recipe for bran cookies. The police arrested 32 men in a raid on a house on Chestnut Avenue. They confiscated 30 quarts of whiskey and gin, as well as dice, decks of cards, poker chips, and several “kittys” of money. The two proprietors of the illegal club were arrested for possession of liquor and running a disorderly house; the others were charged with disturbing the peace.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php