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75 Maple Street
Summit, NJ 07901
908.273.0350

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(973) 273 0350

 

Four Graduate High School

summer cookingThe Summit Herald of May 25, 1907 reported that Summit voters overwhelmingly approved the installation of trolley tracks on Park Avenue. The Summit Hospital Association was holding a benefit concert to help pay for hospital treatment for those who could not afford it. The high school graduating class consisted of three young men and one young lady. A three-year-old boy was run over by a wagon while playing ball on Park Avenue. He was taken to Overlook Hospital by Patrolman O’Riley, where his broken leg was set.

In the classified ads, Miss Blake offered her services as a tutor in English, Mathematics, Latin, French, and German for $2 per hour. A Japanese boy was looking for a position doing house work for a small family. The Watchung Coal Company advertised for a wagon driver (single horse or team). The Lackawanna Railroad offered round-trip tickets to Niagara Falls ($ 9.00) and California ($79.76).

In local baseball, Summit defeated Chatham 4-3 in the 10th inning. William Lawrence, the Union County Sheriff, threw out the first ball. In the Christian Bowling League, the Catholics were in the lead by a significant score, with the Episcopalians in second place.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php

Summit is a Three-Car Town

panhandleThe Summit Herald of May 18, 1901 reported that the collection of the Public Library had grown to 3,500 books. Due to heavy use by the community, library hours were expanded from nine hours per week to twenty hours. Mr. Callender of Springfield Avenue and Mr. Votey of Tulip Street purchased automobiles, bringing the total number of horseless vehicles in Summit to three. Mr. Votey’s name also appeared in the Lost and Found column: his King Charles Spaniel, Rags, was missing. The high school graduating class of ’01 consisted of six young men, four of whom were college-bound. A concert to benefit the YMCA was scheduled, featuring Professor Hendrickson the magician, and Rosani, prince of jugglers. Tickets were 25¢.

Plans were set for the official opening of the Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo, New York. Rumors circulated in Paris that the United States was planning to purchase the Panama Canal project from France. President McKinley received an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from the University of California, and would be receiving another from Harvard.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at: http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php

Getting Rid of "Ain't"

mothers dayThe Summit Herald of May 11, 1923 reported that Clean-Up Week, led by the Town Improvement Association, had excellent results. At its May meeting, the T.I.A. announced that it would be erecting a public bulletin board downtown, and installing six new waste cans throughout the city. At the meeting of the Roosevelt School PTA, praised the students' successful campaign against the use of the word "ain't". Their new goal was to get rid of "I seen" and "I done". Tickets were on sale for two performances of the play "A Tailor Made Man" at the Lyric Theatre to raise funds for the construction of Memorial Field.

The State Fish and Game Commission restocked the hunting areas of New Jersey with over 1400 ring-necked pheasants. The NJ Legislature passed a law permitting game wardens and licensed hunters to shoot stray cats found killing birds.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:

http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.p