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75 Maple Street
Summit, NJ 07901
908.273.0350

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(908) 273 0350

 

Runaway Horse

housewife terrorThe Summit Record of August 25, 1906 reported that a horse tethered to a signpost in front of the Wolff Building on Maple Street was frightened by a passing express van, and bolted onto the sidewalk, uprooting the signpost. It was caught before it could enter a nearby store. A letter to the editor praised Summit resident Anthony Comstock, founder of the New York Society for the Suppression of Vice, and special agent of the U.S. Postal Service. Comstock had been widely denounced in national newspapers for raiding the Art Students’ League of New York and seizing copies of a catalog that contained samples of members’ work, including several nudes. During a local baseball game, part of the bleachers collapsed.

There were only minor injuries. Foreign news included a revolt against the government of President Palma in Cuba, a deadly earthquake in Chile, and the arrest of 12 Japanese seal poachers in the Aleutian Islands.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php

 

New Cases of Infantile Paralysis (polio)

polioThe Summit Record of August 18, 1916 reported that two new cases of infantile paralysis [polio] were discovered in Summit. One of the children was a resident of a six-family tenement on Aubrey Street. The building was placed under a 2-week quarantine, which was enforced by a barbed-wire fence and the presence of a police officer. A scene for a moving picture was filmed at the Summit train station. The Summit area was popular with movie producers because of the natural beauty of the region. Summit letter carrier David Carter returned from Douglas, Arizona, where his unit of the New Jersey National Guard had been stationed in the conflict against Mexican revolutionary Pancho Villa.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php

"Murder" Book for Children

hairdoThe Summit Herald of August 11, 1939 reported that the State Board of Milk Control allowed dairy producers to charge half a cent more per quart. The High School Principal’s report to the Board of Education included recommendations to expand the size of the room for typing classes, and to add driver’s ed to the curriculum. At the Summit Public Library, a little girl requested help finding a book she had read: “the swellest story, just full of murders, robberies, fighting, and magic!” The Children’s Librarian was relieved to discover that the “murder” book was a retelling of Wagner’s Ring Cycle. The “Home on the Range” cooking column offered recipes for various kinds of iced coffee.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php