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75 Maple Street
Summit, NJ 07901
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For Sale: One-Cylinder Cadillac

newhomeThe Summit Herald of November 9, 1907 reported on Tuesday’s election news. In the New Jersey gubernatorial race, Republican John Fort defeated Democrat Frank Katzenbach. Other candidates represented the Prohibition, Socialist, and Social Labor tickets. In New York City, the Tammany candidates had a sweeping victory. Locally, most of the Republican ticket was elected, except for one Council member and the Mayor.

A letter to the editor praised the nine physicians at Overlook Hospital. The writer noted approvingly that although seven of these practiced allopathic medicine and twopracticed homeopathic medicine, the prejudices of the past had been forgotten, and they worked together harmoniously.

The Young Women’s Christian Temperance Union planned to hold a fair on Saturday at the public school. For sale: homemade candy and cake, fancy articles, and dolls with handmade dresses. For amusement: a “fishing pond” for children, and a Gypsy girl telling fortunes. For refreshments: a 35¢ luncheon.

In the classifieds: Lost, a dark yellow Japanese Eskimo dog, reward offered. For sale: a depot wagon with rubber tires for $175; a one-cylinder Cadillac touring car in good condition. Wanted, a good driving horse for winter.


The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php

Priest Catches Thief

PERCxcfThe Summit Herald of November 2, 1917 reported that fundraising for the war effort was in full swing. The “free wool fund” held a card party to purchase wool for volunteer knitters to make sweaters and other garments for soldiers. Mrs. C.A. Woodhull offered free lessons in making socks on a knitting machine. The Treasure and Trinket Fund was looking for donated bits of silver and gold—silver thimbles, broken pieces of jewelry, etc.—which could be melted down and sold to purchase googles, scarves, and sweaters for military aviators. Donation boxes for the Tobacco Fund (to buy smokes for Summit boys in service) were placed in many stores around town.

When $3 was discovered to be missing from the shrine and poor boxes at St. Teresa’s, suspicion fell on a man who had been seen loitering in the church after services. When the man next appeared, sexton Thomas Dwyer watched him from a hiding place behind the altar. The suspect attempted to pry open a poor box with a nail. The assistant rector, Rev. Cornelius McInerney, ordered the man to stop. When the suspect fled, the sexton, rector, and several others gave chase. The rector caught the thief, who was brought to the police station. He identified himself as Joseph Marshall, but added that it was not his real name, as he was afraid of disgracing his family.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php

600 Doughnuts and a Clown

woodcockThe Summit Herald of October 26, 1923 reported that the YMCA and the Rotary Club were planning a Halloween party for the boys of Summit. Entertainment included 6 reels of moving pictures, and a professional clown. For refreshments: 600 sugared doughnuts and 20 gallons of cider.

All Souls' Church celebrated its 10th anniversary. Jersey Central Power and Light invited the public to the high school to view a free moving picture about the day-to-day workings of the company. Motor Vehicle Commissioner William Dill addressed the Business Men's Club. He spoke of the growth of the automobile industry, and of the increase in auto-related deaths. In the first 8 months of the year, 235 people died in automobile accidents in New Jersey--more than died of typhoid fever, scarlet fever, and whooping cough combined.

In the classifieds, Timmie Prout offered a reward for the return of his lost kitten. For sale: a squirrel coat for $500, a mink coat lining for $90, an Encyclopedia Britannica (9th ed., 25 volumes) for $5, and a yellow Guernsey cow

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php