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75 Maple Street
Summit, NJ 07901
908.273.0350

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(908) 273 0350

 

Summit Red Sox Take First Place

hot water

The Summit Herald of June 23, 1941 reported that Mayor Guido Forster expected to run for a second term, despite being recalled to active duty as a Naval Reserve officer. There was some concern in the city as to whether an active-duty officer could legally run for public office, and if he could reasonably expect to return to Summit by January 1, 1942. The 6th-graders at Brayton School closed out the school year with a special performance of their own version of “Aida”. The Summit Red Sox beat Irvington 3-1, taking first place in the Lackawanna League. The Lyric Theater showed “Ziegfeld Girl” starring Judy Garland, Lana Turner, and Hedy Lamarr.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php

Bootlegger Arrested

vacation

The Summit Record of June 16, 1921 reported that a suspected bootlegger was arrested near his home on Aubrey Street when the bundle he was carrying—allegedly vegetables—proved to be a 5-gallon jug of whiskey. A baseball game between the American Legion posts of Summit and Millburn was ended in the eighth inning because of rain, with Summit leading 30-2. Aunt Prudence provided a recipe for a summer punch to serve 50, made with pineapple, tea, grape juice, lemon juice, sugar, and sparkling water. The Lyric Theatre (“New Jersey’s Safest Playhouse”) advertised “Through the Back Door” starring Mary Pickford.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php

Trains, Trolleys, and Bridges

tired out

The Summit Record of June 9, 1906 reported that the Rahway Valley Railroad would soon be completing a track connecting Summit to Elizabeth. Hourly trains would cover the 12-mile distance in 20 minutes. The Common Council considered a proposal to install trolley tracks in East Summit. The Governors of New Jersey and New York appointed members of an interstate commission to investigate the possibility of a “great bridge” across the Hudson River. President Roosevelt and the members of Congress were horrified by the Neill-Reynolds report on the unsanitary conditions in the meat-packing plants of Chicago. Upton Sinclair, whose novel had spurred the investigation, declared that he would continue to oppose the “big beef men”, despite receiving death threats.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php