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75 Maple Street
Summit, NJ 07901
908.273.0350

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Silk Weavers Strike Again

park houseThe Summit Herald of June 22, 1901 reported that the two hundred silk weavers employed at the silk mills of Summit went on strike for increase in their pay rate, which had been 6¢ to 8¢ per yard. The mill owners agreed to an additional of 1¢ to 1-1/2¢ per yard, and recognized the weavers union. The Common Council meeting was crowded with citizens protesting the proposed widening of Woodland Avenue, which would have required cutting down many beautiful trees. The Park House property—three acres and a 100-guest hotel—was sold to Mr. Theodore Beck, a wealthy Hoboken silk manufacturer residing in Summit. The 20-piece Hill City Band announced their first open-air concert of the season. For Sale: a horse, harness, canopy-top surrey complete with whip and carriage robe, for $125.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php

New High School Dedicated

army of shoesThe Summit Herald of June 15, 1923 reported that the new high school would be dedicated the following Monday, with special programs following each evening, including a concert, a Summit Playhouse production, and motion pictures. The Business Men’s Association discussed the possibility of installing modern electric streetlights in the the downtown area. The Lyric Theatre (“The Coolest Place in Summit”) was showing the silent film “Down to the Sea in Ships”, starring Clara Bow. The “Heraldings for Housewives” column gave a recipe for a basic cake, with variations to turn it into pound cake, fruit cake, or Devil’s Food. “For the Motorist” gave auto maintenance tips for those planning a vacation motor tour: check the gears for chipped teeth, rinse out the crank case with kerosene before refilling with oil, and make sure that spark plugs and magnetic interruptor points are clean

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php

Kindness Rewarded

summerwearThe Summit Herald of June 8, 1928 reported that four young men from Summit drove to Montreal for the weekend. They made the 450-mile trip in 16 hours, averaging just under 32 MPH. The local chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution announced they would donate a new 8 by 10 foot flag for the city flagpole in Bonnel Park. The editors weighed in on the recent Supreme Court decision permitting the wiretapping the phones of bootleggers.

Miss Helen Campbell, a bank employee in Summit, was due to inherit $8,000 because of a lucky mistake and an act of kindness. She rang the doorbell for the wrong apartment, and met Mrs. Eliza Burris, who was ill and alone. Miss Campbell befriended Mrs. Burris, and returned to visit her. It was later discovered that Mrs. Burris was the long-lost sister of famous stage actress, Clara Morris. Mrs. Burris inherited her sister’s estate, but died one month later. She left it to the young woman who had been so kind to her.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php