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75 Maple Street
Summit, NJ 07901
908.273.0350

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Larned Wins again!

daily bathThe Summit Herald of August 17, 1907 reported that Summit resident and champion tennis player William Larned won the Eastern Doubles Championship with W.J. Clothier of Philadelphia as his partner. Fred Brenn of Russell Place lost his barn and two horses to fire, despite the best efforts of the fire department. Neighbors attempted to rescue the horses, but were driven back by the extreme heat. The blaze was put out after two hours, and did not spread to any other buildings.
 
President Roosevelt announced that he would not interfere personally in the nationwide telegraphers’ strike, which shut down communications all over the country. Residents of Town Creek, Alabama, began a petition to rename their town Teddyville, in honor of the President. The Pope Manufacturing Company, one of the largest producers of autos and bicycles in the U.S., went into receivership.
 
The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:

Summer Entertainments

klocksinThe Summit Herald of August 10, 1907 reported that B.B. Walling’s store had been entered, and a selection of pocket knives and fishing tackle stolen. The police tracked down the culprits, who had entered through a broken cellar window. They retrieSummer ved the stolen property, and released the thieves—a pair of 8-year-old boys—to the custody of their parents. Nightly gospel meetings were held in a tent on Summit Avenue. Guests at the Beechwood Hotel were invited to an amateur minstrel show to benefit the Arthur Home [for Blind Babies]. A carnival on the baseball grounds (nightly, with matinees on Wednesdays and Saturdays) was raising money for the Summit Athletic

Association baseball team. In the most recent game in the Lackawanna League, Summit easily defeated Irvington, 8-4.
In Chicago, a Federal District judge levied a $29 million fine against Standard Oil because of illicit practices by the Rockefeller oil monopoly. In Scranton, representatives of 41,000 unionized railroad workers met to discuss their grievances. Although wages had been raised, the working day had not been reduced from 12 hours to 10 hours, as promised.


The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php

Vacation Time!

willysThe Summit Herald of August 3, 1923 reported that President Warren G. Harding died in San Francisco the previous day. The front page contained large illustrations of the late President and of his successor, Calvin Coolidge. Governor Silzer announced an investigation into garbage from New York City drifting onto New Jersey beaches, due to garbage scows dumping their loads 5 miles from shore, instead of the 25 miles required by law. The Lyric Theatre presented the movie “Monte Cristo” (based on the Dumas novel), produced by William Fox and starring John Gilbert and Estelle Taylor.

The social news column was full of vacation plans. Dr. Clara Tuttle was off on a motor trip to her former home in Rockland, Maine. Mr. and Mrs. Vander Sommer of New York City and their daughter, Lucille, came to Summit to spend three weeks at the Beechwood Hotel. The Thiesmeyer family returned from a month at Budd’s Lake. At the Summit train station, friends of the Eugene Jobs family gathered with flowers and fruit baskets to say farewell as they began a trip to the Pacific Coast.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php