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75 Maple Street
Summit, NJ 07901
908.273.0350

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(973) 273 0350

 

Sorry, Boys--No More Cigarettes

halls shoesThe Summit Herald of February 23, 1907 reported that the Summit Board of Trade had a special speaker at a recent meeting.  William Morse of New York described the new technique of disposing of garbage by incineration. The editor of the Herald urged a careful examination of methods, equipment, and maintenance costs, saying that taxes were already high enough. A new cornerstone for the Central Presbyterian Church was delivered, to replace the one which was defaced by vandals.  The Summit Post Office announced a civil service exam for vacant positions as clerk and letter carrier. Salary for a carrier would be $600/year to start, going up to $850 in the second year. The classifieds included an ad for the sale of Topsey T, a “fast-trotting mare” with an impressive pedigree. The Lackawanna League met in Newark to discuss the upcoming baseball season, including a proposal to open a franchise in Elizabeth. The State Assembly considered a bill to raise the age for buying cigarettes from 14 to 18.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php

Patriotic Meeting

dodgeThe Summit Herald of February 16, 1917 reported that a patriotic mass meeting would be held at the Lyric Theatre, sponsored by the Summit chapter of the National Defense Organization, and with Major General Leonard Wood, former Army Chief of Staff, as a guest speaker. A patient at Fair Oaks Sanitarium broke away from his attendant and jumped from the Springfield Avenue bridge onto the railroad tracks. A train passed over him without striking him, but he died of shock several hours later. The YMCA hosted the annual Boy Scouts fathers and sons banquet. The Summit Equal Suffrage League met at the home of their president, Mrs. John Dey, to discuss the subject of prison reform. The Summit branch of the NJ Association Opposed to Woman’s Suffrage cancelled its monthly meeting. In the Church bowling league, the YMCA team was in the lead, with the Presbyterians in last place. Mrs. Carroll P. Bassett shared a letter she received from an American aid worker, describing how the money raised by the children of Summit was being used to help war orphans in France.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php

War Won't Last Long

february coiffuresThe Summit Herald of February 9, 1940 reported that Boy Scout troops created special window displays in local stores to honor the 30th anniversary of the Boy Scouts of America. Former German official Max Brauer spoke at the First Baptist Church, saying that Hitler’s aim was to dominate all of Europe. He advised the audience that America should stay out of the war, which he predicted would be much shorter than the 1914-1918 war, as the German people would surely revolt against Hitler when conditions became intolerable. In January, 177 people found jobs through the Summit office of the New Jersey State Employment Service. The Strand Theater was showing “Balalaika”, starring Nelson Eddy as an aristocratic Russian captain in love with a beautiful singer from a family of revolutionaries, while the Strand Theater presented Laurel and Hardy in “The Flying Deuces”.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php