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75 Maple Street
Summit, NJ 07901
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8 MPH--It's the Law

easywayThe Summit Record of May 24, 1902 reported that Common Council disputed an additional payment of $125 to the Secretary of the Board of Health because of extra work caused by cases of smallpox in Summit. Proponents of the motion claimed that Council could not control the Board's spending; opponents said that the Board was too free with taxpayer money, and that the $125 amounted to a gift, not salary. A motion was passed to refer the matter to the City Solicitor. The Editor commented that the Health Secretary was paid a "handsome salary" of $300 per year, and that a few months of hard work did not justify a larger payment.

Councilman Wood brought up the growing problem of automobiles speeding on Summit streets. He suggested placing signs on every street within city limits, announcing the legal speed limit of 8 miles per hour. The motion was passed. The Editor praised this motion, suggesting that if speeders refused to stop for police, as happened in some other cities, barriers could be erected at certain intersections to force them to stop.

In the Classifieds: For sale, a rubber-tired runabout and a "sound, kind and speedy" horse. For sale, a new milch cow. Lost, a strawberry roan horse. Return to Martin's stable.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php

Summit Artist in the Met

fatigueThe Summit Herald of May 17, 1940 reported that the National Red Cross War Relief Fund set a goal of $10 million to help people in Holland, Belgium, and Luxembourg. The local chapter's quota was set at $5000. Friends of artist Junius Allen, a former Summit resident, were pleased to learn that the Metropolitan Museum of Art had purchased one of his paintings for its permanent collection. The annual tournament held by the Board of Recreation at the Mabie Playground declared new champions in hopscotch, marbles, and jacks.

In the Classifieds: For sale, a chauffeur uniform and cap, never worn, $40. Found, male fox terrier. Lost, pair of brown trousers. Return to tailor shop on Beechwood Road.

The "Home on the Range" column gave recipes for sauces for fresh vegetables: Mock Hollandaise Sauce, Bacon Sauce, Egg Sauce, and Spiced Carrots.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:
http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php

Electric Lights for the Streets of Summit?

bonesThe Summit Record of May 10, 1890 reported that the Township Committee heard proposals from several companies for public street lighting. Options included gas and electricity (either the Westinghouse incandescent light or the Thomson-Houston arc light). The Editor expressed the hope that, all things being equal, the contract would be awarded to Summit resident W.A.E. Doying, who proposed the Westinghouse system, at a cost of $20 per light annually.

The Editor praised the efforts of the New York Evening Post to expose the rottenness of Tammany Hall. He hoped they would continue those efforts until the people of New York rose up to "crush the monster of corruption they have nurtured into strength."

Justice Kelly sentenced Agnes Pullen to 45 days in the county jail upon complaint of her husband for drunkenness and disorderly conduct.

In the classified ads: for sale, a street watering cart, a one-horse surrey, English pug puppies, and an English pony mare (13 hands). Lost, a small bunch of keys. Liberal reward offered.

The Library has a searchable database of local historical newspapers. Search or browse at:

http://www.digifind-it.com/summit/home.php